Wants & Needs work with Year 6 at Liss

Greetings to all of our friends in Kafuro. We have heard that there is the possibility of P7 returning to school on September 20th. We hope that this works out and that you are able to resume your learning before Primary Leaving Examinations.

Year 6 at Liss Junior School have begun their work on the wants and needs learning that takes place in the UK every year and allows us to make some comparisons with Kafuro.

Our first task was to give each pair of children the outline of a child and  to give the outlined child a name. Next, we discussed what this child would need to grow up into a happy and healthy adult. The children were set the task of identifying twenty things that would help the child achieve this. At this point there was no input and the children could completely decide for themselves.

Once the pupils had completed their twenty things that a child would need, they wrote them on post its and placed them in the middle of the child. Next, they were asked to remove five of the things that the child could do without – this reduced the items to fifiteen. This exercise was repeated twice more and generated a lot of debate on each table as the children argued over what should stay. Eventually, each group had five items left which they shared with the rest of the class and compared.

Our next step was to introduce UNICEF wants and needs cards and perform a similar exercise. However, firstly the children were asked to divide the cards into three groups: those they thought were Most ImportantImportant and Least Important. Then, once again, Mr Stanley asked the pupils to reduce the cards down to just five, and the classroom became very animated as the children had to make some very difficult decisions over what should stay and what should go. It was interesting to see how the children made their choices compared with previous years. Although there were a lot of similarities, there were also some notable differences. This will be shared in a future blog post.

Once the pupils had completed this exercise, they compared the five wants and needs they had left with the post its they had created in the previious lesson. As a class, we then discussed the difference between wants and needs.

Needs: the things that are absolutely necessary for all children to have a happy and healthy life

Wants:the things that are nice to have but not necessary for a full life.

We finished this first session by discussing some key questions: Are wants and needs different for people in the UK and Uganda? Why don’t all children in the world have what they need?

To the first question, the pupils were quite clear that needs would be the same in both countries. However, there was an acknowledgement that wants would be different. For example, a pupil in the UK might want a Playstation or an Xbox, but for a pupil in Uganda, where electricity is scarce in places, a new bike would be something that they might really want. We were able to use Eben’s expertise as he was able to tell us that growing up in Malawi there were often power cuts, so what was the point of having a console?

The pupils were y not shocked that children in the world didn’t have everything they need. We discussed some of the reasons why this may be so:

  • War
  • Some countries don’t have enough money to feed people
  • Some governments are corrupt
  • Exploitation of poorer countries by richer countries
  • Climate change

There was widespread disbelief in the class that millions of people go hungry in the world when there is more than enough food to feed everyone comfortably.

Next, the pupils looked at the needs of children are protected. We studied the United Nations Charter for the rights of the Child. It was interesting to see the children make links with their work in the first session. One group were delighted to see that the right to play was enshrined in their convention and felt that justified them placing ‘play’ in their final five cards.

In our next session we will be trying to marry up each need from the first session with other rights in the charter.

Sanitation Assembly at Liss

Today, Rowan Class presented their assembly about sanitation to the pupils and parents of Liss. This encompassed of all the work that we have carried out this term as well as showing how we have worked together with our friends at Kafuro Primary School to improve sanitation there through the water pipeline and refurbished toilets. The assembly also introduced Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This is something that we teach implicitly at Liss, but now need to make far more explicit. Below you can download the PowerPoint of our assembly.

http://kafuroliss.primaryblogger.co.uk/files/2020/02/Sanitation-assembly-5.2.2020-2.pptx

Pizza sale with Liss tomatoes

On Friday, Rowan Class pupils at Liss held a pizza sale using many of the tomatoes tthat last year’s Rowan Class had grown in the bottle greenhouse. Mr Stanley cooked down the tomatoes and added onion before blitzing it into a sauce. He then made a pizza dough and cooked pizzas in the cob oven. The children quickly sold out of the pizzas on the layground but not before raising £30 (150,000UGX) towards completing the new classroom at Kafuro.

Ugandan-style food tasting

For our Year 6 DT project this term, the children will be designing, making and eating a Ugandan-style  meal. The children have already carried out some research on the internet about popular Ugandan foods, but today Mr Stanley prepared some Ugandan food for the children to taste. The food included:

Roast potatoes – In Uganda these are known as Irish potatoes

Sweet potatoes – some of our Ugandan friends refer to them as sweat potatoes

Beef muchomo – pieces of beef marinated in oil, garlic and mild curry powder grilled to perfection.

Plantain chips – Green banana chips lightly salted.

Salad – red onion, carrot & cabbage

Chapatti – made from flour, water with a tiny pinch of salt.

Katchembali – another salad with tomato, green pepper, onion and chilli.

The children took the opportunity to taste all the foods. They then had to complete an evaluation form giving each food a mark out of ten and explaining why they awarded the mark. Next, the children will have to design their own Ugandan plate of food covering the major food groups.

We would like to ask our Ugandan friends what British food would they like to eat?

Using Maths to raise money

On Friday, Rowan Class made cakes to raise money for kitchen equipment for our friends at our twinned school, Kafuro Primary School. But this was no ordinary cooking lesson. Mr Stanley gave the children basic recipe cards and then the children had to use ratio to scale the recipes to the amount of cakes that were required. The children had to use multiplication and division skills to correctly scale the ingredients. Only then were they allowed to go to the kitchen and start baking. Once again the children had to measure out the ingredients accurately using scales.

When all the children had finished baking, 98 cupcakes had been made that were sold on the playground as part of ‘Treat Friday.’ The cakes sold out very quickly!

We would like to ask our friends at Kafuro whether they have done any follow up baking since Mr Stanley and Mrs Green visited in July and August. Has Gloria set up her own baking school?

Sports Day 2016

It was that day again! The 2016 version of Liss Junior School Sports Day had an opening ceremony and a Mexican wave built in. The competition was as fierce as ever with the red team narrowly winning from the yellows. Congratulations to everyone who took part and thanks to Mrs Meredith for organising such a successful event.

 

Photos of Class AS in action are below